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Posts Tagged ‘iodine’

The Thyroid is an **endocrine gland located at the base of neck on both sides of the windpipe below the larynx or voice box. Symbolically it looks like a butterfly with open wings! On Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thyroid the illustration and information on the thyroid is well done.
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The thyroid regulates and influences the various chemical reactions throughout your body. It produces growth hormones, cell regeneration and repair and helps to maintain our metabolism and oxygen levels. It also produces the hormone thyroxine. Thyroxine contains iodine and the thyroid gland cannot produce this hormone unless our diet contains a small amount of iodine. Too little thyroxine or too much can result in disorders such as Goiter and Dwarfism.
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Hyperthyroidism means too much thyroxine in the system and hypothyroidism means too little.
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(new) “Accumulating evidence suggests that hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis dysfunction is relevant to the pathophysiology and clinical course of bipolar affective disorder. Hypothyroidism, either overt or more commonly subclinical, appears to the commonest abnormality found in bipolar disorder.” Journal of Thyroid Research http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jtr/2011/306367/ 
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I suffer from hypothyroidism, which can be misdiagnosed as Chronic Fatigue or Fibromyalgia.  (Now more than ever, studies are being done, as indicated above to examine thyroid dysfunctions and behavioral problems).  If you suspect a thyroid problem, the best way to check to this out is through a laboratory blood test. Unfortunately many patients can have thyroid tests come back normal because most standard tests aren’t sensitive enough to identify an underactive thyroid gland or hypothyroidism.  There is a TRH (Thyrotrophin-releasing hormone) that is much more sensitive than the routine blood tests. and can almost prove beyond a doubt that a person is suffering from an underactive thyroid.  It’s a bit more involved but if the normal test is coming back normal, and you suspect your thyroid ‘s hormones aren’t up to snuff you could at least talk to your doctor about it.
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I’ve learned the thyroid gland produces three important hormones, Triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) which require iodine and L-tryrosine for their production. These hormones help to regulate and metabolize the cells in our body. As they are released into our blood most of the molecules bind to blood proteins. The third hormone produced by the thyroid is calcitonin. It helps with metabolizing calcium.
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The Encyclopedia of nursing and allied health (a very interesting site)http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_gGENH/is_all/ai_2699003787 states…..
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“Calcitonin
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The thyroid gland also secretes calcitonin. The thyroid’s C-cells are stimulated to secrete calcitonin when there is a high concentration of calcium in the blood stream. The function of calcitonin is to inhibit the amount of resorption of calcium from the bone and to regulate the amount of calcium in the blood stream.”
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This site also talks of T3, T4 and TSH. The pituitary is the master gland of the endocrine system. It controls the release of thyroid hormones by releasing a ‘thyroid stimulating hormone’ also known as TSH.
 
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**The endocrine glands (“chemical messengers”) produce and release hormones directly into our bloodstream. Hormones influence our height, and build, sexual activity, mental sharpness, ability to respond to stress and so much more! We discuss more about this in the metaphysical section of the thyroid.
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4/6/2013 EAT WITH THE SEASONS
Before we continue, I’d like to interject here a moment before going on, that I’ve learnt something interesting in regard to metabolic and thyroid issues.  Apparently throughout history people ate foods that were available and in season, after all they had no other choice.  For instance, winter time is a time of warm, cooked foods and the ever-famous chicken noodle soup; we enjoy turnips, and even winter squash and finish our dinners with a nice warm pudding or apple pie. But now, thanks to transportation (ships, trains), we can get spring, summer, fall and winter foods all year long.  Apparently this can cause problems with people who suffer from thyroid  and low basal body temperatures…consuming cold, raw foods during winter may affect thyroid function.  Same too can be said about eating too many hot meals in the middle of summer.
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We’re in spring now, the vegetables and fruits that are at their peak are asparagus, blackberries, green onions, leeks, lettuces, new potatoes, peas, red radishes, rhubarb, spinach, strawberries and watercress. Depending on where you live, you could probably add to this and the other seasons too.
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Summer is a time of apricots, blueberries, cherries, eggplant, fresh herbs, green beans, hot peppers, melon, okra, peaches, plums, sweet corn, sweet peppers, tomatoes and zucchini. 
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Fall is when apples come into season, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, collards, grapes, kale, pears, persimmons pumpkins, winter squash and yams.
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Winter of course is when we bundle up and enjoy beets, cabbage, carrots, citrus fruits radishes, onions rutabagas, turnips and winter squash.
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Unfortunately, I can’t list ‘all’ foods, however, depending on where you live, you could find a list of fruits and vegetables that are categorized for each season.  If you do suffer from thyroid problems, perhaps try foods that are in season for a month and see if you feel more energetic, flexible and look healthier too.  If you do, tell us about it!
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SYMPTOMS
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I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism almost 12 years ago. I started showing symptoms of this dis-ease when beginnning a new job after being a stay at home mom for 11 years. The first signs were heart palpitations and achiness all over my body. When visiting the doctor it was ‘assumed’ I was premenopausal . I wore a heart monitor for a 24 hour period which revealed the upper chamber of the heart was ‘fluttering’……”no cause for concern”, the doc said. My body was also going through temperature changes and mood shifts. The next stage was feeling lethargic and tired almost all of the time. No matter how much sleep, I was always tired, sensitive and on edge, ready to pounce on anyone or anything that got in my way. Waking, I was cold, my eyes and face puffy…no matter how much cream put on my skin, it was extremly dry and flaky. I was a mess!
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From advice of friends and family who knew all these moods and changes were out of character, I returned to the doctor’s office. A blood test was taken and revealed my thryoxine levels were extremely low. 50 mcg’s of Levothyroxine Sodium was prescribed. Just four days after taking this, my whole system started balancing itself out. I felt like myself again! Not wanting to be on a drug for life, I discovered L-Tryosine, iodine and high levels of B vitamins were good to change the levels of thryosine (T4) in my system. Trying these, I took myself off of the Levothyroxine and was able to manage without it for two years. During this time, I discovered that the hypothalamus monitors our blood level of T3 and T4. If low the Hypothalamus sends a message via the thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) to the pituitary which then sends its message with the thryoid stimulating hormone (TSH) through the bloodstream. I was amazed at the body’s ability to replenish and repair itself. And so began my journey and initiation into the healing profession. However. the body cannot do it all alone. We are composed of a body, a mind and a spirit. Change one and the others (mental, emotional, spirit) have to adjust to create a balance. Not only was this a new perspective on how and why my body does the things it does, I was also learning how my feelings and beliefs were creating the life I was living.
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If the thyroid test had revealed hyperthyryoidism, symptoms include a faster heart rate, hypersensitivity, weight loss, insominia, nervousness, muscle pain, etc.. The hypothalamus would try to reduce or stop TRH which would lower TSH and consequently diminsh the production of thyroid hormone.
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Of the many websites I searched, this one “Thyroid Disease and Risk Symptoms” by Mary Shomon http://thyroid.about.com/od/symptomsrisks/a/symptomsrisks.htm on About.com is simply explained and extensive on listing symptoms of hypo and hyperthyroidism. I highly recommend it. She also has a Thryoid Forum allowing you communicate and learn from others. In fact there are many Thyroid Forums which I’ll list at the bottom of this blog.
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http://thyroid.about.com/cs/basics_starthere/a/symptoms.htm in this section Mary Shomon goes into great depth to describe the symptoms, for hypo and hyperthyroidism.
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Here is a list of the basic symptoms for both Hypothyroidism and Hyperthyroidism from Mary Shomon’s site
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Symptoms of Hypothyroidism (An underactive thyroid)
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fatigue,
exhaustion
feeling run down and sluggish
depression
difficulty concentrating, brain fog
unexplained or excessive weight gain
dry, coarse and/or itchy skin
dry, coarse and/or thinning hair
feeling cold, especially in the extremities
constipation
muscle cramps
increased menstrual flow
more frequent periods
infertility/miscarriage
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Symptoms of Hyperthryodisim (An overactive thyroid)
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nervousness
irritability
increased perspiration
thinning of your skin
fine brittle hair
muscular weakness especially involving the upper arms and thighs
shaky hands
panic disorder
insomnia
racing heart
more frequent bowel movements
weight loss despite a good appetite
lighter flow, less frequent menstrual periods
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Also, she has created a list of great questions that you can print out and answer to take to your doctor. http://thyroid.about.com/cs/basics_starthere/a/hypochecklist.htm I commend her on the depth of research and hard work!
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I never realized the importance of the thyroid until recently. This gland is not only involved in keeping our hormones aligned, it also keeps all the organs in the body balanced and running smoothly. It also regulates our metabolism, heart rate, blood pressure and body temperature.
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An illness in the body could indicate a thyroid problem. Also, if your autoimmune system is out of whack this can also be the thyroid. Hormone failure can also indicate problems with the thyroid, adrenals and ovaries. Thyroid dysfunction is NOT something to ignore. If you suspect a problem, please check it out before more harm is done.
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Another link to this page is the infiltration of exposure to harmful chemicals which have been linked to thyroid problems. From the moment of conception our children have been accumulating chemicals in their body. It may take years or decades before exposure to chemical products may cause harm to the thyroid as well as cancer, behavioral problems, learning difficulties and hormone imbalances and infertility or sterility problems.
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Children are entering puberty at the tender of age of 8 and the girls first menstrual period is beginning under the age of 12! Hand-made chemicals are mimicking hormones and disturbing the natural hormone balance of the human body. Soy products are escalating estrogen levels 6 to 11 times higher in children than an adult, causing early sexual development.
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This gland is also critical to ‘fetal brain development’. At the bottom of this blog is a link to a site that suggests ADD/ADHD can be linked to poor thyroid function. Children born to mothers with low thyroid hormone levels have been shown to have trouble with motor skills, coordination and other psychomotor functions.
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In ancient times, the thyroid was considered a sex gland and described as ‘the third ovary’. (more on this later)
*”Hypothyroidism can actually cause the body to reject a fetus.  Broda O. Barnes, M.D., a pioneer in hypothyroidism research, found a link between hypothyroidism and miscarriage.  Of 301 female hypothyroid patients in his practice, 164 had miscarriages.  In treating the women, he found that successful conception and pregnancies often correlated with times when the women were taking thyroid supplements….
The thyroid gland, in addition to causing infertility if it is underactive can also influence reproduction through its antibodies.  In a recent study, the presence of a thyroid antibody (thyroglobulin or TG, an iodine-bearing secretion) was shown to have an association with a risk of early miscarriage.” Burton Goldberg ~ Women’s Health Series
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CHOLESTEROL AND THE THYROID
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Cholesterol is a slippery, waxy substance….it exists in every cell of the body. Without it we wouldn’t be able to digest our food.
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“Cholesterol is assuredly a vital bodily substance. Without it you cannot grow, you cannot digest your foood, you cannot mature, and you will die. Cholesterol may also be a potent antioxidant that scavenges and protects against harmful free radicals. It may even be one our natural defences against those factors that cause arterial damage. Other defences include Vitamins A, C, E, B-1, B-6, Beta carotene, niacin, pantothenic acid, chromium, manganese, selenium and zinc. These are all vitamins and minerals which we cannot produce interally and must get from our diet. If we do not get enough of them, then the body may have to work overtime to produce one of the few internal self defences it can manufacture — cholesterol. When one supplements his/her diet with ample amounts of antixoidant and free radical scavenging nutrients, elevated cholesterol levels often return to normal.
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High Cholesterol is not a disease. It is a symptom of insults to our bodies through lack of exercise and improper diet. If we correct the causes of those insults, then cholesterol levels tend to normalize themselves — safely and naturally.
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If high cholesterol levels do not normalize themselves in response to reducing sugar intake, increasing dietary fibre, regular exercise, and supplementary antioxidents, then there is one other factor to consider — low thyroid function.”
David W. Rowland, PhD
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If you suspect ‘low’ thyroid function even though your blood test came back normal, this may be why……..
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“There is considerable evidence, however, that blood tests fail to detect many cases of hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid). It appears that many individuals have “tissue resistance” to thyroid hormone. Therefore, their body may need more thyroid hormone, even though the amount in their blood is normal (or even on the high side of normal). A low axillary temperature suggests (but does not prove) hypothyroidism. Optimal temperature regulation is an essential aspect of holistic therapy for these disorders.”
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This site also describes using a basal thermometer test upon waking in the morning. When you first wakeup, before getting out of bed, place this thermometer under harm and hold it there for about fifteen minutes. There is also a basal chart on this article for you to write down your findings. A temperature of 97.6 or lower could indicate an underactive thyroid.
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If you type in (thyroid) basal thermometer on google you’ll get thousands of hits on this subject and a wealth of information.
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Hyperthyroid can cause a condition called Graves Disease. This disease is where the body produces antibodies which stimulate the thyroid into action.
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“……’Graves’ disease. This condition afflicts a great many people. In this disease, the thyroid gland enlarges and releases too much thyroid hormone. The person can become restless and overactive, and the heart often races.
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How Can Thyroid Problems Affect The Eye?
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People with excess thyroid hormones (Graves’ disease) can develop many eye problems. One characteristic symptom is a protrusion of the eye (exophthalmos), in which the person appears to be staring or the eyelids tend to pull back from the eye. The tissues and muscles around the eye appear swollen, and this swelling (or edema) contributes to the eye protruding. In this state the eye can become dangerously dry, resulting in damage to or ulceration of the cornea, the clear outer covering of the eye. The person may also experience double vision. In severe cases, the optic nerve connecting the eye to the brain may become damaged, leading to blindness.”
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Also, high estrogen levels can affect the thyroid. Adding progesterone cream has been known to decrease your need for thyroid supplements. So estrogen and progesterone and thyroid hormones are somehow connected. And….hormone balance is also linked to osteoporosis, which we’ll discuss in a another section of this blog.
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“Estrogen causes food calories to be stored as fat. Thyroid hormone causes fat calories to be turned into usable energy. Thyroid hormone and estrogen have opposing actions. The “central command post” of this opposition may be in the hypothalamus, the pituitary, the thyroid gland, or the body cells where the hormones enact their destined roles. My hypothesis is that estrogen inhibits thyroid action in the cells, probably interfering with the binding of thyroid to its receptor. Both hormones have phenol rings at a corner of their molecule. Estrogen may compete with thyroid hormone at the site of its receptor. In so doing, the thyroid hormone may never complete its mission, creating the hypothyroid symptoms despite normal serum levels of thyroid hormone. Progesterone on the other hand, increases sensitivity of estrogen receptors for estrogen and yet, at the proper level, inhibits many of estrogen’s side effects. That is what is mean when we say that progesterone opposes estrogen: The lack of progesterone in a woman still making estrogen or taking estrogen supplements leads to the condition of unopposed estrogen……….patients with unopposed estrogen (progesterone-deficient) become less so when progesterone is added and hormone balance is attained.”
John R. Lee, M.D. with Virginia Hopkins, “What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause”
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Another disease of the thyroid is called Hashimoto‘s thyroiditis, it is where the body creates antibodies against the cells of the thyroid gland.
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Hashimoto’s, antibodies react against proteins in the thyroid gland, causing gradual destruction of the gland itself, and making the gland unable to produce the thyroid hormones the body needs.
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A ‘Goiter’ (another thyroid problem) is an abnormal enlargment of the thyroid gland. The body’s neck may appear swollen and this can create the sensation of being unable to breathe, hoarseness, food seems stuck in the throat and coughing. It is caused by a shortage of iodine in the diet. With iodized salt introduced back in the 1920’s, this disease isn’t as prevalent as it was back at this time.
CNN has a wealth of information in their health library. Here’s one on the thyroid/Goiter.
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WHAT CAUSES THE THYROID TO DYSFUNCTION
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GENETICS
1) A family history of thyroid problems
2) Depression
3) Autoimmune disease
4) Chronic Fatigue
5) Weight Problems
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My family genetics suffers from most of the above. My brother had his thyroid removed 10 years ago due to a serious disease called thyroid toxicosis or thyrotoxicosis. A couple of the many symptoms of thyrotoxicosis is excessive sweating as well as weight loss. Gary couldn’t tolerate the intense summer rays in the summer……within moments his body and clothes were dripping wet. This is a hyperthyroidism condition.
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As you know, I suffer from hypothyroidism. So did my father. Dad suffered from insomnia, high cholesterol, constipation, tiredness and too many other symptoms to mention. My father was in the Armed Forces and suffered a heart attack at the young age of 18 when his plane suddenly took a dive and his body slammed against the navigation controls he was managing. Given an honorable discharge, he was hospitalized in a military hospital where he came down with scarlet fever which caused muscle damage to his heart. His immune system became stressed, exhausted and worn out, causing his thyroid levels to decrease. Suffering the embarrassment and anger of an early discharge, my father sank into states of depression and suffered a nervous breakdown. For years he couldn’t assert or express his repressed emotions. He literally lost his voice. It wasn’t until he started a personal development program that he learned to express, write and bring into focus his past guilt, inadequacy, and painful emotions and let them go. He not only healed his wounds but also discovered his many hidden gifts and talents.
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My father was the first to teach me about self expression as a tool for self help as well as spiritual growth and understanding. In the next section we’ll learn the underlying meanings of thyroid problems, its affiliation to the 5th chakra and throat area as well as how this area affects the body energetically.
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There seems to be a a connection to hypothyroidism, being left handed or ambidextrous. This interested me greatly because I am left handed and about 60% of the thyroid sufferers who visited an alternative clinic I worked at were either ambidextrous or left handed.
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Bloodline Family Members at Risk. Since the most common type of thyroid gland failure is this inherited condition, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, examinations of the members of your bloodline family may reveal other individuals with thyroid problems. [Example: In the 28 family members of my personal blood line, we are as follows: One with celiac disease, one with multiple sclerosis, three with rheumatoid arthritis and seven with hypothyroidism; two with arthritis and 1 with celiac disease also have hypothyroidism as their single autoimmune condition; one of the relatives with arthritis also had gallstones; none of us write left-handed; however, all of us with hypothyroidism are ambidextrous.]
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DIET
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This interesting site by Victoria Anisman-Reiner, B.Sc., C.C.A., http://naturalmedicine.suite101.com/article.cfm/causes_of_thyroid_disease states…
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“Certain foods have been shown to inhibit the effect of thyroid hormones on the body. These include vegetables from the Brassica family: kale, broccoli, spinach, cabbage, cauliflower, and mustard (the greens and the seeds or condiment).
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Soy, wintergreen, turnips and walnuts may also be a problem to those vulnerable to low thyroid. Tobacco (although it’s not part of anyone’s “diet”, per se) and sugar have also been shown to have a negative impact on thyroid health.
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Because of the thyroid’s connection to the immune system, people with allergies may find that the allergens to which their bodies react can affect thyroid health, as well.”
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Drinking too much coffee can have an adverse affect on the thyroid as well as too much consumption of the ‘Mint’ family (basil, bugleweed, catnip, lavender, lemon balm, marjoram, motherwort, oregano, peppermint, rosemary, spearmint. thyme.)
Here are links to the dangers of Soy products
Thyroid cancer and soy
Soy, the unsuspected problems with thyroid
Thyroid disease and soy
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DRUGS and the Thyroid
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It’s only been the last 10 or 15 years, doctors have learnt more about the adverse reactions to Estrogen supplements and creams. Water retention, weight gain, cancer, osteoporosis, thyroid problems, strokes and other symptoms screamed for recognition.
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I just found this web page http://www.vitalitymagazine.com/node/1630 which is extensive on thyroid conditions and treating them naturally. It’s a gold mine of information!
In this informative page, written by Michael Vertolli, clinical herbalist…..
“The factors that can contribute to thyroid dysfunction include:
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(1) Psychological stress: This is significantly affected not only by the number and intensity of potentially stressful factors in our life, but more significantly by our strategies for dealing with stress which ultimately determine the degree to which these factors affect us. Personality factors are also important, such as being high-strung, extremely ambitious or aggressive, or a tendency to experience a lot of anger also tend to create significantly more stress in our life.
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(2) Dietary factors: Excess consumption of sea vegetables, iodized salt, tyrosine supplements and stimulants such as caffeine can contribute to hyperthyroidism. Excessive consumption of raw vegetables and herbs from the Mustard family (e.g. arugala, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, mustard greens, rapini, etc.) and Mint family (e.g. basil, bugleweed, catnip, lavender, lemon balm, marjoram, motherwort, oregano, peppermint, rosemary, spearmint, thyme, etc.) and soy products, and deficiencies of iodine, zinc and vitamins A, B2, B3, B6 and E can contribute to hypothyroidism.
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(3) Drugs: Estrogen therapies opium derived drugs can contribute to hyperthyroid, while androgens, corticosteroids and salicylates may be implicated in hypothyroid.
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(4) Exercise: Lack of exercise can contribute to both hyper- and hypothyroidism, as can insufficient sleep.
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(5) Toxicity: Many toxins can bind to hormone receptor sites resulting in negative health consequences. Also of particular importance for thyroid function is radioactive iodine which is a by-product of nuclear fission from power plants and weapons testing. Iodine is an important component of thyroid hormone and these substances tends to be found in the highest concentrations in our thyroid.
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(6) Autoimmune factors: Many cases of both hyper- and hypothyroidism have an autoimmune component. Psychological and toxic stress are major factors contributing to the development of autoimmune conditions.
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(7) Tumours: Cysts and tumours of the thyroid can result in hyper- and hypothyroidism. One of the major causes of tumours in this organ is radioactive iodine.
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(8) Iatrogenic causes: Post-therapeutic hypothyroidism can occur from over-zealous treatment of hyperthyroidism resulting in destruction or removal of too much thyroid tissue.
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Foods and herbs from the Mustard and Mint families are very nutritious and many have important medicinal properties. Regular consumption of these plants will not lead to underactive thyroid function unless other factors are also involved, particularly iodine deficiency, which is rare since the advent of iodized salt. Only those who already have hypothyroidism need be concerned. In these cases foods from the Mustard family should be reduced, but not eliminated from the diet and only eaten cooked. Spices and herbs from the Mint family aren’t as much of a concern because they aren’t consumed in as large a quantity. However, regular consumption of herbal products containing bugleweed, motherwort and lemon balm should be avoided.”
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Thyroid Disease Linked to Flouride and Toxic Chemicals
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Our children are at risk of developing thyroid problems in their later years through toxic chemicals in the air, some plastic bottles and cups as well as flouride. Thyroid cancer has been on the rise since 1995; we need to be more vigilant in learning more about what chemicals are used in household products that can be a risk to ourselves and especially our children. If the body is unable to release the accumulated toxins we are facing chronic situations that can affect the health and well being of the human physical body. These toxins can continue to aggravate and persist even after the toxins seem to have gone. We may no longer become conscious of them but they could manifest as an illness in later life.
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Also, our children are fighting stressful conditions of obesity which is reaching epidemic proportions. Not only are they at risk of developing diabetes but other health problems as well.
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Doctors have long suspected a link between weight gain and certain cancers, including colon and breast cancers. But the new study, published Friday in the journal Lancet, suggests it could also increase chances for cancer of the esophagus, thyroid, kidney, uterus and gall bladder, among others……
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In men, an average weight gain of 33 pounds increased the risk of esophageal cancer by 52 percent, thyroid cancer by 33 percent, and colon and kidney cancers each by 24 percent, the research found.
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In women, a weight gain of 29 pounds increased the risk of cancer in the uterus and gall bladder by nearly 60 percent, esophagus by 51 percent and kidney by 34 percent, the study said.
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It may seem to make sense that being overweight is connected to a low metabolism or possibly even a condition such as underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism). But it’s actually uncommon for excess weight to be related to a low metabolism. Still, seeing your doctor can help to determine if a medical condition could be influencing your weight.
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The recent report from Environmental Defence found alarmingly high levels of bisphenol A – also known as BPA – in of some of the most popular plastic baby bottles sold across Canada. As a result, parents are unknowingly putting their babies at risk.
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BPA is known to mimic estrogen and has been linked to early puberty in girls, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, and obesity.
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“Any baby that’s drinking out of these bottles is going to be ingesting this toxic chemical every time they take a sip,” warned Rick Smith, Executive Director of Environmental Defence.
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“This chemical has been linked to thyroid problems in later life, breast cancer in women and prostate cancer in men.”
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Fluoride has been a regular addition to tap water all over North America for some time, but recently its presence has been causing a little extra stir.
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That’s mainly because of a 2007 Health Canada panel that recommended the fluoride levels in water be reduced. The drug, which is said to help remineralize the enamel in teeth, thus helping to prevent cavities, has been tentatively linked to a rare type of bone cancer like the type
Terry Fox had, not to mention the possibility of reduced intelligence in children and impaired thyroid functionality.
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LEARNING DIFFICULTIES – ADD/ADHD – And THYROID FUNCTION
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Patients with ADD are also known to have a substantially higher incidence of thyroid hormone resistance resulting in impaired performance on an auditory discrimination task. T3, the active form of thyroxine (the hormone produced by the thyroid), is very difficult to measure accurately. Inadequate T3 activity can result in diminished brain function.
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The Thyroid Gland and Learning Difficulties – http://www.ldanatl.org/hcp.asp this article is a ‘must read’.
Thyroid disease is common, and its effects on the gastrointestinal system are protean, affecting most hollow organs http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20351569
Celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease http://gut.bmj.com/content/35/6/844
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Supportive and informative Thyroid Forums
Thyroid Cancer forums
Thyroid Forum free E-Book
Thyroid Disease Active Low-Carber Forum
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to be continued…..***

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Working and almost finishing Part 3 of the prostate, this came to my attention and thought it good to share it with you.

SCIENTISTS DISCOVER LINK BETWEEN PROSTATE CANCER AND VITAMIN A

“A recent study published in the journal Nucleic Acids Research (Sept. 4 2012) has revealed that scientists, led my professor Norman Maitland from the University of York, have discovered a connection between vitamin A and prostate cancer.  His research has found a particular prostate cancer gene that is under the control of retinoic acid, a form of vitamin A”. http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/249907.php 

Don’t panic…this is a relatively new report and there doesn’t seem to be a lot of information about it….I’m sure in the near future we’re going to definitely hear a lot more. 

 “Vitamin A is a fat-soluble compound [antioxidant], requiring fats and minerals for proper assimilation. Vitamin A consists of three biologically active molecules: retinol, retinal and retinoic acid. There are two forms of vitamin A, preformed vitamin A, (also called retinol and found in foods of animal origin) and provitamin A (derived from carotene, a pigment found in dark green, yellow and orange vegetables and fruits).  Beta-carotene is converted to usable vitamin A through the use of a hormone called thyroxine, produced by the thyroid gland…..when the diet lacks adequate vitamin A the body utilizes stores from the liver”. Barbara Bouyet

“Retinoic acid is a nutrient you need in small amounts for cell development and growth.”  http://www.livestrong.com/article/316999-sources-of-retinoic-acid/?utm_source=livestrong_opar&utm_medium=1

This very informative site and related topics, will help you to understand what retinoic acid is and its importance in the maintenance of our health. Retinol is also used in creams and gels for acne, skin-related problems and to reduce the look of wrinkles. 

Vitamin A, an antioxidant, protects the body against infection and offers us a greater immunity to overcomes diseases, inflammation and illness.  It is essential in the utilization of all vitamins and minerals, especially calcium and phosphorous.  Vitamin A is important for the health of your eyes.  Carotene is probably one of the best foods that is converted by the body, into vitamin A.  It usually takes about 6-7 hours for it to be absorbed and converted to Vitamin A.  A deficiency of vitamin A can cause eye problems (ie., night blindness, corneal ulcers), skin problems, fatigue, teeth and gum disorders, loss of appetite, reproductive problems and more….when in excess can cause nerve damage, bone and joint pain, headaches and in some cases birth defects.  

If you are consuming a number of different food groups and various colors of fruits and vegetables, then you’re getting enough natural vitamin A in your diet without the need of a supplement.  

Natural sources of vitamin A, dandelion greens, carrots, apricots, peach, cantaloupe, kale, collard, sweet potato, squash, parsley, spinach, lettuce, papaya, prune, pumpkin/pumpkin seeds, peach, asparagus, tomato, watermelon, green beans, okra, brussel sprouts, tangerine, soya bean, avocado, cucumber, celery, pistachio nuts, pecans, currants, blueberries, rasberries,  black currant, grapes, cashew nuts, rhubarb, apple, strawberries, figs, grapefruit and the list goes on!

Liver and fish also contain high levels of vitamin A – wild caught fish contains more of the omega oil 3 fats, protein, vitamins and minerals – farmed fish float lazily around a pool and are mostly grain-fed and lacking in essential anti-inflammatory omega 3s.  Our bodies are unable to produce essential fatty acids….we need these EFAs to help the body repair itself and create new cells.

Postives and negatives of eating fish http://www.livestrong.com/article/477156-vitamin-a-in-fish-and-seafood/

Warning:  If you are diabetic or have **thyroid problems—you may not be able to convert beta-carotene to vitamin A.  Apparently the hormone thyroxine, produced by the thyroid is needed to convert beta-carotene to vitamin A.   Could this cause a higher incidence of prostate cancer?  

**Your thyroid gland is like the gas pedal to your metabolism.  Similar to the adrenals, it produces and releases more of its hormones during times of stress.  If you’ve been under a lot of stress lately and find yourself exhausted to the point of feeling achy and depressed, you should get your thyroid checked.  Without enough thyroxine, the thyroid has trouble absorbing iodine—this protects you from various types of radiation—known to cause cancer.  Impotence can also be caused by an iodine deficiency, as well as irregular heart beat, hardening of the arteries, rapid pulse, nervousness, irritability, dry hair, obesity and even poor concentration. 

“Worldwide, the number one cause of hypothyroidism is low iodine in the diet.  Iodine is essential for the thyroid to produce hormone, as is tyrosine, a common amino acid that is broken down from protein but can also be manufactured by the body.  Because both tyrosine and iodine are in fair abundance in most American diets, the common problem of low thyroid is most likely related to our compromised immune systems.” Nisha Jackson Ph.D.

Vitamin A health newsletter http://www.alsearsmd.com/it-is-not-vitamin-a-it-is-not-beta-carotene/

Foods high in iodine http://www.healthaliciousness.com/articles/natural-foods-high-in-iodine.php

Thyroid function and prostate cancer http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17571964

Thyroid hormone and prostate cancer http://www.yourhealthbase.com/database/a136b.htm

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